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This is more confirmation, but it has already been known in the microbiology community for some time.

Many of the genes that contribute to antibiotic resistance are far older than human use of antibiotics.

How can that be? A couple ways. Mom Nature has been playing the antibiotic game for a very long time. Most of our antibiotics come from antibiotic producing organisms in nature (penicillin for example). The countermeasures have long been out there, but only in a small percentage of the bacteria out there, s

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Cyrus Farivar

Further Reading

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One of the key features of Continuity across Apple devices is Handoff. Handoff allows Apple's first-party apps and any third party developers to send an app's data seamlessly between devices so you can "pick up where you left off."

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For example, start composing an email message on your Mac in OS X Mail and a symbol will appear on your iPhone's lock screen to continue writing on the go. Open a webpage in Safari on your iPhone and a Safari icon will appear in your Mac's Dock to load the same webpage. Or start reading a story in the official AppleInsider app on your iPhone, and quickly continue on your iPad.

Handoff works with Calendar, Contacts, Mail, Maps, Messages, Notes, Reminders, Safari, Pages, Numbers, Keynote as well as any enabled third party apps. Some examples of apps you can try with Handoff are Pocket, Wunderlist, and the NYTimes app.

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Editor’s note: Tom Goodwin is senior vice president of strategy and innovation at Havas Media.

In 2015 it seems foolish to have a digital or mobile strategy, you just need a business strategy for the modern world. Whether it’s Uber reinventing the transportation business, Instagram changing the nature of photography or Netflix disrupting video content, what binds these companies is they brought digital thinking to the very heart of their companies, not just bolted it onto the side.

From Tesla to Instacart, Hotel Tonight to Twitter, BuzzFeed to WhatsApp, every high-growth, high-profit, high-value unicorn was constructed with one thing in mind: the modern world.

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As curious creatures, we attempt to understand the world around us in many ways and nowadays that usually boils down to big data visualization. Whether we're creating models of large-scale systems or breaking down reality into wireframes and exposing the digital bones beneath, the data-rich internet and open-source tools are helping people map and explore the world in new ways. People are leveraging technology to make their voices heard in political realms and using digital expression to bypass physical conflict. Indeed, in this digital age, the lines between life and art are becoming blurred. Don't believe us? Then explore the gallery below for just a few examples.

Gallery | 11 Photos

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2015-04-18 14:10:01 UTC

The dinosaurs walk among us — and they really love to jam.

YouTube user and musician Eddie van der Meer arranged an acoustic version of the Jurassic Park theme song, featuring your favorite (CGI) dinosaurs from the movie.

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Turn IKEA Cubbies into a Rustic Apothecary Chest

If you didn’t see the before pictures you’d probably never guess that the rustic apothecary chest on the right was actually made from a basic IKEA cubby console. What a transformation.

Corey Decker on Sawdust 2 Stitches walks you through this makeover. Besides some wood pieces, stain, drawer pulls, and hinges, all you need are decent carpentry skills.

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The average phone case is basically a piece of plastic that protects your device when you drop it. But what if you could add modular features to your iPhone like a heart rate monitor, a grappling hook, or a backup battery? Now you can.

Moscase comes to use from Hungary and is being crowdfunded to the tune of $150,000. The case protects your iPhone 6 or 6 Plus and has a removable back. You can quickly snap out the back and replace it with one of the optional tools, turning your case into a breathalyzer, a speaker, or even an e-ink screen for reading.

The device comes in two parts. The bumper without a backplate can sense your pulse, temperature, and body impedance AKA how fat you are. It costs $129 and comes with a “passive” backplate. A model with one “active” backplate costs $219. I think the e-ink solution is the coolest, allowing you to read on the back of your phone, saving your battery for more important work.

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When OnLive announced that it would be officially shutting down its cloud gaming service on April 30, gamers who enjoyed the service had to confront the fact that they would have to seek an alternative. That’s when Larry Gadea, a frequent OnLive user, decided to take matters into his own hands.

On April 12, Gadea posted a blog update on his website that detailed how any gamer can operate his or her own gaming cloud service.

Related: OnLive streaming game service closing on April 30 due to Sony buyout

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The spring issue is here

Find out what Sofia Vergara wants from her modern smart home. Get your copy today for big savings off newsstand prices.

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It’s been a week where the new trailer for Star Wars: The Force Awakens proved it was possible for the Internet to be optimistic about something without a wave of cynicism immediately following it, and a genuinely amazing music video from David Hasselhoff proved that irony has itself discovered irony and now no one knows what they really like and just pretend to like anymore. (No, really, go watch that video; it’s nuts.) With all that in mind, here are the other highlights from this thing we call Internet over the last seven days.

The New Hero of Star Wars

What Happened: Never mind the new Star Wars: The Force Awakens teaser; the thing that really blew up on the first day of Star Wars Celebration is the next movie’s new droid, BB-8.

Where It Blew Up: Twitter, blogs, media think pieces

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End Date: Apr 29,2015 07:59 AM GMT-07:00
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schwit1 writes A giant welding machine, built for NASA's multi-billion dollar Space Launch System (SLS), has to be taken apart and rebuilt because the contractor failed to reinforce the floor, as required, prior to construction: "Sweden's ESAB Welding & Cutting, which has its North American headquarters in Florence, South Carolina, built the the roughly 50-meter tall Vertical Assembly Center as a subcontractor to SLS contractor Boeing at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans.

ESAB was supposed to reinforce Michoud's floor before installing the welding tool, but did not, NASA SLS Program Manager Todd May told SpaceNews after an April 15 panel session during the 31st Space Symposium here. As a result, the enormous machine leaned ever so slightly, cocking the rails that guide massive rings used to lift parts of the 8.4-meter-diameter SLS stages The rings wound up 0.06 degrees out of alignment, which may not sound like much, "but when you're talking about something that's 217 feet [66.14 meters] tall, that adds up," May said.

Asked why ESAB did not reinforce the foundation as it was supposed to, May said only it was a result of "a miscommunication between two [Boeing] subcontractors and ESAB."

It is baffling how everyone at NASA, Boeing, and ESAB could have forgotten to do the reinforcing, even though it was specified in the contract. It also suggests that the quality control in the SLS rocket program has some serious problems.

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For many years now, we've been writing about the need for ECPA reform. ECPA is the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, written in the mid-1980s, which has some frankly bizarre definitions and rules concerning the privacy of electronic information. There are a lot of weird ones but the one we talk about most is that ECPA defines electronic communications that have been on a server for 180 days or more as "abandoned," allowing them to be examined without a warrant and without probable cause as required under the 4th Amendment. That may have made sense in the 1980s when electronic communications tended to be downloaded to local machines (and deleted), but make little sense in an era of cloud computing when the majority of people store their email forever on servers. For the past few years, Congress has proposed reforming ECPA to require an actual warrant for such emails, and there's tremendous Congressional support for this.

And yet... it never seems to pass. The story that we keep hearing is that two government agencies in particular really like ECPA's outdated system: the IRS and the SEC. Since both only have administrative subpoena power, and not the ability to issue warrants like law enforcement, the lower standards of ECPA make it much easier for them to snoop through your emails without having to show probable cause. Last year, in a Congressional hearing, the SEC's boss, Mary Jo White, was questioned about this by Congressman Kevin Yoder, who has been leading the charge on ECPA reform. As we reported at the time, in the conversation, White clearly said that the SEC needed this ability or it would lose "critical" information in its investigations. You can see the conversation from 2014 below, where White (starting around 2:30) explains how vital this process is to the SEC:

Here's the key line:
"What concerns me, as the head of a... law enforcement agency, is that we not put out of reach of lawful process... what is often, sometimes the only, but critical evidence of a serious securities fraud.... And we use that authority quite judiciously, but it's extremely important to law enforcement."
What struck us as interesting last year was White admitting that the SEC appeared to regularly use this process, since she noted that it was "extremely important" and provided "critical evidence."

Fast forward to this week, and the same two players were involved in yet another Congressional hearing. You can see that conversation here as well, with the critical point being made after about four and a half minutes, where White says some of the same stuff, about the privacy protections, and how even if the SEC used this process it still notifies the subscribers to give them a due process right to protest the subpoena... but also, oddly, seems to claim that the SEC never actually makes use of this process:

Here's the key line this time (the full response is a jumble of half sentences and unfinished thoughts, so it's a bit of a mess):
"While these discussions have been going on, to try to sufficiently balance the privacy and the law enforcement interests, we've not to date to my knowledge proceeded to subpoena the ISPs. But that, I think, is critical authority to be able to maintain -- done in the right way and with sufficient solicitousness and it's very important to the privacy interests which I do think can be balanced.
As I said, if you watch her entire response, it's a complete mess of half-finished thoughts, which seems rather typical of someone trying to sound like they're answering a question but not actually doing so. Later in the same answer, she insists that taking away this authority might take away an important tool.

So, we know that the SEC really wants to keep this tool. But last year it said it was "extremely important" and provided "critical evidence." This year, she's saying that the SEC isn't even using the tool. So, uh, which is it? Is this tool absolutely necessary for critical evidence, or is it not even being used by the SEC?

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It's been more than a year since Comcast announced its plan to buy fellow cable giant Time Warner Cable in a $45 billion deal, but it still hasn't received the blessings of various regulators. Now, word is leaking out from unnamed sources to Bloomberg and the New York Times that suggests Justice Department lawyers will recommend blocking the merger. Many consumer groups, politicians and executives from other companies have raised concerns over the last year that the combination would put too many customers, and too much of the nation's internet under one banner, despite a promise by Comcast to divest itself of some 3 million customers. Facing so much negative attention, Comcast is trying to improve customer service and reassure skeptics that it will be a friendly giant telecommunications company, but hasn't had much success convincing anyone that its plan will make cable TV better.

The NYT report mentions that while Comcast could potentially negotiate potential conditions to place on the deal -- a key part of its NBCUniversal acquisition a few years ago -- that process hasn't started yet with the Justice Department or the FCC. Execs for both companies are still publicly confident the deal will go through, and fellow cable giant Charter has already made alternative acquisition plans. No one knows how long it may take for the various reviews to come to a conclusion, and even if the report recommends blocking the deal, it could be overruled by the division's senior officials. For now, we wait, but an update could come when TWC reports its quarterly earnings April 30th, or during Comcast's earnings report May 4th.

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Over the course of the last day, some of my geek buddies have described getting emotional upon watching the new "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" trailer, especially when Han Solo pops up at the end. Seeing the visibly older Harrison Ford as Han, they say, reminds them of the first "Star Wars" movie they watched -- how old they were at the time, the amazement they felt seeing eye-popping TIE fighter tricks and their first lightsaber duel, how the "Star Wars" canon has affected their lives since.

So I wasn't surprised to see actor Matthew McConaughey, in the video above, getting clearly overwhelmed while watching the trailer that came out Thursday.

But then things take a bizarre turn and he gets really, really emotional. Like the kind of emotional you'd get if you were seeing your kids' faces for the first time after you'd been busy traveling through an interdimensional black hole and they hadn't talked to you for the equivalent of decades.

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The industry is focusing less on electronic record features and more on sharing the data held in them.

Last year at HIMSS14 I asked rhetorically whether we would actually focus on how informatics could fix healthcare. Would we finally realize that the whiz-bang features of one electronic health record versus another are less important than whether they can talk to each other, using an API-based approach to data exchange?

This year at HIMSS15, the largest event for healthcare IT, API-based exchange has a name -- FHIR -- and virtually everybody and everything is focused on it as the standards framework.

Not quite everybody, of course. One young entrepreneur who approached me in the aisle didn't yet even have a company, but his business concept was a natural for FHIR. However, he wasn't aware of it. I sent him off to the Interoperability Showcase (to Georgia Tech's I3L and Josh Mandel's SMART on FHIR booths) so he could learn about it and how to use it. Last year, though, I could far too easily find established companies whose teams needed a similar education on FHIR.

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What’s your lifetime total time spent riding in an Uber? A few hours? A day? How about 21 days, 22 hours and 33 minutes, over a total of 2,958 trips — currently the top of the leaderboard on new the site Uber Totals. That accomplishment belongs to a former Twitter product manager named Christopher Golda.

(Golda’s nearly 3,000 trips completely crushes my own total — 69 rides for a total of more than 18 hours.)

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Apple designers Jony Ive and Marc Newson were on hand in Italy to attend a high-fashion coming out party for Apple Watch at upscale Milanese restaurant Carlo e Camilla. During the festivities, important guests were provided early copies of Apple Watch, as well as what appears to be Sport Bands in custom colors.

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Source: Umberta Gnutti Beretta via Twitter

Socialite Umberta Gnutti Beretta, wife of Beretta firearms president Franco Beretta, posted to Instagram a few photos of tonight's gala attended by Ive, Newson and fashion and design luminaries.

One picture shows Beretta picking out a Sport Band for her early Apple Watch unit, selecting from an array of at least of 15 different colors including numerous light pastels, bright yellows and reds. The unannounced colorways jibe with photographs from British cyclist Will Carling, who said Ive gave him an unreleased UK power adapter and red Apple Watch band.

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