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Posted by on in Slashdot
An anonymous reader writes: Tech Crunch reports that Amazon quietly rolled out changes to how their Prime subscriptions can be shared. The good news is that existing members aren't immediately losing their current sharing setups. It used to be that Amazon would let Prime subscribers share free shipping and a few other benefits with up to four other "household" members, with little restriction on what counted as a "household." The bad news: as of last weekend, Amazon now limits sharing to one other adult and four "child" profiles. The adults will need to authorize each other to use credit/debit cards associated with the account. Amazon didn't make any announcement about this, so it's unknown how long existing Prime shares will stay in effect. They could disappear when the subscription is up for renewal, or earlier if Amazon decides to crack down on it.
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Stacey Newman / Shutterstock

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2015-08-04 20:57:59 UTC

Aaron Blaise, the former Disney animator who worked on classic films like Aladdin, Beauty and the Beast and The Lion King, has created a digitally rendered image that pays homage to Cecil the lion, who was hunted and killed by an American dentist last month.

"When I heard the news about Cecil, I got inspired to create a tribute image," Blaise wrote on his website.

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Develop a Pregame Ritual for Your Creative Work

Warm up routines and pregame rituals are pretty common among athletes, but we don’t usually think about them with other things. Over on Medium, writer Srinivas Rao points out a pregame ritual is useful for creative types too.

Using writing as an example, Rao lays out why a pregame ritual is important:

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It’s day two of The International 2015, Valve’s massive $18 million Dota 2 tournament, and play has ground to a halt in the very first match of the very first round due to a crippling distributed denial of service attack (DDoS).

Just when things started to heat up in match one of the best-of-three competition between Evil Geniuses and compLexity Gaming, the game was suddenly struck by lag and paused soon thereafter. The tourney has been on hold for over 45 minutes now. (Update: It's back in action as of 4:20 P.M. ET.) Fortunately, analysts are filling in the void on the livestream, and host Paul “Redeye” Chaloner just stated on-air that the delay is definitively due to a DDoS attack.

Which, of course, begs the question as to why Valve didn’t figure out a way to have The International’s games travel over a dedicated local network, but hey, that’s neither here nor there. Hopefully Valve gets some better Internet shields in place before Saturday’s grand championship.

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Security researchers have found a way to track a user's smartphone Web usage through battery life.
HTML5: 10 Tips That Will Change Your Life

HTML5: 10 Tips That Will Change Your Life

(Click image for larger view and slideshow.)

Your smartphone's battery is probably the last thing you'd guess is threatening your privacy, but a new research paper says that's exactly the case. Websites can make use of battery-life data given up by HTML5 to identify mobile devices.

The World Wide Web Consortium debuted the battery status API back in 2012 with the goal of helping websites maximize the battery life of mobile devices that visit them. The basic function allows websites to see how much battery life remains on any given device so the site can switch to a low-power mode if needed. For example, websites viewed in Chrome, Firefox, and Opera can suspend select power-sapping features if the site detects a device has limited power left.

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That Multitool Clip Now Hides a Bottle Opener and Nail File in Your Hair

The original Clippa replaced the Leatherman hanging off your belt with an ingenious but near-invisible multi-function hair clip. And now there’s a new version of the tool that swaps a serrated edge for a metal file, and a bottle opener for a hex wrench.

That Multitool Clip Now Hides a Bottle Opener and Nail File in Your Hair

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The DynaFlash projector (it can't actually display 3D images like that)

Projection mapping theoretically adds a Holodeck-like level of immersion to simulations, but current projectors are simply too slow to keep up with fast-moving people. That won't be an issue if University of Tokyo researchers have their way. They've developed DynaFlash, a 1,000 frames per second projector that can keep up with just about any moving object. It can't beam images into thin air, like you see above (that's just for show), but it can seemingly do everything else -- even if you shake or spin an object very quickly, you'll still get the image where you wanted it to be. The trick involves adding a special controller to a DLP (digital light processing) projector that, combined with fast image output, delivers both high frame rates and low latency.

The current projector is crude: it outputs at a mere 1,024 x 768 resolution in a 256-color scale, which pales in comparison to the visual quality you'll get from just about any conventional projector. The scientists expect to ship a real product as soon as summer 2016, though, and the possibilities extend beyond just extra-involving games. You could use it for highly detailed 3D measurements -- a parking lot could keep track of the exact positions of cars as they move around, for instance, letting you know which spaces are about to be filled. DynaFlash will need a higher resolution and a richer palette to be effective for much more, but that may only be a matter of time.

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There’s a common misconception that Macs aren’t susceptible to any sort of malware or virus, but if evidence of exploits in the past hasn’t convinced you that isn’t the case, this news from Malwarebytes might. A recently discovered exploit, known by the file that makes it possible, DYLD_PRINT_TO_FILE, allows attackers to use the error reporting system within Mac OS X to create a file with root privileges. Once software has access to your root, it can manage every aspect of your system from installing malicious applications to locking you out entirely.

Fortunately, the practical example of the exploit is a bit less sinister than that. By modifying the sudoers file, the file which contains the list of users that have root privileges, the software can erase the evidence of the exploit and will still have root privileges. From there, it silently uses an app called VSInstaller to install adware called VSearch, Genieo, and MacKeeper, three different pieces of malicious software, then launches an app store page for a download manager called Shuttle.

Related: Protect your Mac for free with these five anti-virus apps

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Apple authorized reseller B&H Photo is holding its Back to School Savings event this week, with $100 discounts on some current-generation iPads and 11- & 13-inch MacBooks, as well as $200 discounts on several current 15" MacBook Pro configurations.

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In addition to the Apple highlights — which we've rounded up below — B&H is also discounting a wide selection of cameras, photography equipment, storage devices, video cameras, headphones, TVs, and drones as part of the sale. All ship free with no sales tax collected on out of state orders.

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iPad mini 3
16GB Gold WiFi + Cellular $529.00 for $429.00+ ($100 discount)
128GB Silver WiFi Only $599.00 for $499.00+ ($100 discount)
128GB Silver WiFi + Cellular $729.00 for $639.00+ ($90 discount)
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iPad Airs
128GB Gray WiFi + Sprint Unlocked $929.00 for $449.00+ ($480 discount)
128GB White WiFi + Sprint Unlocked $929.00 for $499.00+ ($430 discount)
128GB White WiFi + AT&T $929.00 for $509.00+ ($420 discount)
128GB Gray WiFi + AT&T $929.00 for $519.00+ ($410 discount)
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Early-2015 MacBook Airs
11" Air (1.60GHz/4GB/128GB) $899.00 for $799.99+ ($100 discount)
13" Air (1.60GHz/4GB/128GB) $999.00 for $899.99+ ($100 discount)
13" Air (1.60GHz/4GB/256GB) $1,099.00 for $1,099.00+ ($100 discount)
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Early-2015 13" MacBook Pros
13" 2.7GHz i5/8GB/128GB $1,299.00 for $1,199.00+ ($100 discount)
13" 2.7GHz i5/8GB/256GB $1,499.00 for $1,399.99+ ($100 discount)
13" 2.9GHz i5/8GB/512GB $1,799.00 for $1,699.99+ ($100 discount)
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Mid-2014 13" MacBook Pros
13" 2.8GHz i5/8GB/512GB $1,799.00 for $1,449.00+ ($350 discount)
13" 3.0GHz i5/8GB/512GB $1,999.00 for $1,549.00+ ($450 discount)
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Mid-2015 15" MacBook Pros
15" 2.2GHz/16GB/256GB $2,049.00 for $1,849.00+ ($200 discount)
15" 2.5GHz/16GB/256GB $2,099.00 for $1,899.00+ ($200 discount)
15" 2.5GHz/16GB/512GB/M370X $2,499.00 for $2,349.00+ ($150 discount)
15" 2.5GHz/16GB/1TB/M370X $2,999.00 for $2,799.00+ ($200 discount)
15" 2.8GHz/16GB/512GB $2,599.00 for $2,399.00+ ($200 discount)
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Mid-2014 15" MacBook Pros
15" 2.5GHz/16GB/512GB/750M $2,499.00 for $1,999.00+ ($500 discount)
15" 2.8GHz/16GB/1TB/750M $3,199.00 for $2,899.00+ ($300 discount)

The deals above are just a few of the many ongoing exclusive offers on Macs and iPads. Check out deals.appleinsider.com and prices.appleinsider.com to see if there's an ongoing offer that will save you hundreds on your next Apple purchase.

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studio23.jpgStage 2 at YouTube Space LA fills about 2,500 square feet. Kevin Mills/Google

LOS ANGELES -- Want to be a star? Aspiring entertainers still find themselves, suitcase in hand, heading to Hollywood.

But the quest is no longer for that breakthrough audition in front of a big-name director. These fame-seekers are making bee-lines to studios tucked away in lesser known pockets of the Los Angeles area. Digital microstudios -- spaces that boast advanced cameras and industry-grade lighting so the next generation of talent can shoot clips for their YouTube or Vine channels -- are hidden in a former garment factory downtown or sprawled through aviator Howard Hughes' old helicopter facility.

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You probably remember flipping through Highlights magazine as a child, while in the waiting room of your doctor’s office, perhaps. But now, this longest-running children’s magazine of 69 years is attempting to make an impact on mobile. The company has partnered with San Francisco-based startup Fingerprint to help transition the brand – and the activities that were once found within its printed pages – to mobile devices.

This would not be the first time Highlights has tried to make an app work. The company previously introduced several games on the App Store, starting in 2010, but never became established as a well-known mobile brand. If anything, the partnership with Fingerprint is an attempt to change that.

It’s not surprising that today’s kids may not know of Highlights. These days, they’re spending less time reading magazines, and instead spending much of their time playing games on tablet computers, streaming Netflix, or engrossing themselves in virtual worlds like Minecraft. The idea that they’d somehow be interested in a paper magazine filled with hidden picture puzzles and stories feels kind of quaint.

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imac-5k-retina-11

The 27-inch, 5K retina iMac is a beautiful desktop computer, but it’s a bit too expensive for many people. This is about to change as the latest beta of OS X El Capitan tells us more about an upcoming iMac that features a smaller 21.5-inch display with a 4K resolution — an insane 4096 x 2304 display to be exact. Expect this new computer in the next few months.

With prices now starting at $1,999, the 27-inch, 5K iMac is much cheaper than when it first came out. When Apple announced the 5K iMac, it cost $2,499. But even at $1,999, you still have to spend a bit more money to get an SSD or fusion drive. Add another upgrade or two, and you could end up with a powerful yet expensive desktop computer.

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INTEL IS ADDING MORE FINANCIAL WEIGHT TO its drive to employ more ladies and ethnicities, and will reward employees who bring in suitable applicants with a bonus payment.

Like the rest of the industry Intel has a problem with attracting or employing ladies, it is not clear which, and, like the rest of the chaps, Intel wants to do something about it.

The firm has already announced a fund to drive technology industry minorities towards its offices, revealing a $300m investment and a five-year plan.

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Phoenix 850se

Today, HP is selling the ENVY Phoenix 850se gaming PC for a whopping 30% off the retail price. With six CPU cores, loads of RAM, and a solid-state drive, this beefy desktop is a steal at less than a thousand bucks.

Phoenix 850se Inside, the Phoenix 850se features a fourth generation hexa-core 3.3GHz Intel Core i7-5820K CPU, a discrete Nvidia GTX 745 graphics card (with 4GB of memory), 12GB of DDR4 RAM, a 256GB solid-state drive, a DVD burner, Bluetooth, and 802.11b/g/n/ac WiFi support. And since this configuration ships with a DVI-D port, an HDMI port, and a VGA port, you can easily connect to nigh-on any HDTV or PC monitor.

The hexa-core CPU, fast DDR4 RAM, and 500W power supply are superb, but the default graphics card is relatively weak. It will run plenty of games on lower settings, but you’ll probably want to upgrade to a better graphics card during checkout, or somewhere down the line. If that 256GB SSD is too small for you, it has room for two additional 3.5-inch drives to boot. And if you want more RAM, you can easily bump it up to a full 32GB.

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We've written a few times about the ridiculousness of so-called ag-gag laws, that prohibit photographing or videotaping farms (sometimes even from public land). These laws were pushed for heavily by large industrial farmers who were sick of animal rights advocates getting images and videos of the conditions in farms and slaughterhouses that were questionable. Whatever you might think of the practices of those advocates, banning taking photographs or videos seemed like a really questionable move -- which would have a chilling effect on whistleblowers of all kinds. It seemed like it had to be unconstitutional -- and a court in Idaho agrees, declaring that state's law unconstitutional.

The court does not mince words, noting that under this law, Upton Sinclair's The Jungle would likely have been illegal:

The story of Upton Sinclair provides a clear illustration of how the First Amendment is implicated by the statute. Sinclair, in order to gather material for his novel, The Jungle, misrepresented his identity so he could get a job at a meat-packing plant in Chicago. William A. Bloodworth, Jr., UPTON SINCLAIR 45–48 (1977). Sinclair’s novel, a devastating expose of the meat-packing industry that revealed the intolerable labor conditions and unsanitary working conditions in the Chicago stockyards in the early 20th century, “sparked an uproar” and led to the passage of the Federal Meat Inspection Act, as well as the Pure Food and Drug Act.... Today, however, Upton Sinclair’s conduct would expose him to criminal prosecution under § 18-7042.

The State responds that § 18-7042 is not designed to suppress speech critical of certain agricultural operations but instead is intended to protect private property and the privacy of agricultural facility owners. But, as the story of Upton Sinclair illustrates, an agricultural facility’s operations that affect food and worker safety are not exclusively a private matter. Food and worker safety are matters of public concern. Moreover, laws against trespass, fraud, theft, and defamation already exist. These types of laws serve the property and privacy interests the State professes to protect through the passage of § 18- 7042, but without infringing on free speech rights.

With this background and context, the Court finds that § 18-7042 violates the First Amendment right to free speech. In addition, the Court finds that § 18-7042 violates the Equal Protection Clause because it was motivated in substantial part by animus towards animal welfare groups, and because it impinges on free speech, a fundamental right.

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Mark Walton

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2015-08-04T09:00:00-05:00

Microsoft had plenty to show at E3—including the likes of Halo 5: GuardiansMinecraft on HoloLens, and a brand new game by Rare. But in an unusual move, the company decided to save the rest of its Xbox One and PC lineup for this year's Gamescom, promising "as much new content" as at E3. Ars UK will be on the scene to see if that promise holds true.

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Maybe you’ve already seen the video where a human reporter pretends his hand is a smartphone at the close of his televised segment. Yes, he's tapping and swiping on his palm, not his Palm — there is no device. My first reaction was to laugh and point a derisive finger at the BBC's Chris Mitchell in that WTF way the internet has conditioned me to respond. But having slept on it, I realize Mitchell isn’t terribly different from me or anyone else.

Mary Meeker’s annual Internet Trends report made headlines a few years ago when she revealed that cellphone users reach for their phones about 150 times per day. That’s almost once every 6 minutes assuming 8 hours of sleep. While some of those experiences are rewarded with need-to-know information or a smile, more often than not, checking a phone is just a mechanical compulsion done when faced with being alone.

People reach for their phones 150 times per day

The great American sociologist Louis CK once observed that people use smartphones so that we never have to feel that loneliness. "You never feel completely sad or completely happy, you just feel kind of satisfied with your product and then you die."

As an experiment, yesterday I muted and kept my phone pocketed while seated alone at a cafe for 15 minutes. It was uncomfortable. I pull out my phone at traffic lights, while standing in line at the cash machine, or waiting to pay at the market. I do it without thinking, on impulse, as a diversion — just as soon as life begins to idle.

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Posted by on in Wired

There’s a reason Woody Allen once dubbed pigeons the rats of the sky. They’re filthy. They poop on everything, and that stuff can carry disease. And they pester you mercilessly, especially when you’re just trying to eat a sandwich. Everyone knows they’re gross.

Well, almost everyone. Photographer Mårten Lange loves them, and says pigeons aren’t the problem, cities are. “Pigeons are dirty because cities are dirty,” says Lange, whose book, Citizen, features striking black-and-white portraits of Columba livia domestica. “So if you find them disgusting, look around you.”

The Swedish photographer, who has made similarly stunning portraits of crows in Tokyo, started photographing pigeons while living in London last year. He was drawn to how they struggle, much like humans, to overcome the challenges of a hostile cityscape. Each day presents a number of dangers: flying into a window, being eaten by a cat, losing a toe to those bits of string that always seem to wind around their feet. “These birds are very often quite beat up, dirty, crippled and just sad, but they never give up,” he says.

Citizen, Études Books, 2015.Citizen, Études Books, 2015. Mårten LangeThough pigeons typically gather in flocks, Lange shot them individually using a long lens to blur the background and an on-camera flash to make the birds look like cut-outs. Given that pigeons are essentially fearless, getting close was no problem. “The flash would make them twitch sometimes, but they were quite indifferent to being photographed,” Lange says. The whimsical portraits look like they were made in a studio. Each bird appears surprisingly unique and regal, its eyes and gestures communicating emotions like fear, anger, playfulness, and contentment. You almost expect them to talk. “They are individuals,” Lange says, “just like us.” Maybe he’s right. Pigeons are pretty smart, after all. And they’re industrious, capable of finding their way home across great distances—a trait that made them particularly useful for communication during the First and Second World Wars. Charles Darwin and Nikola Tesla both loved them. And they can actually be quite beautiful, as Lange’s photographs show. But the photographer isn’t trying to make anyone love pigeons, only appreciate them as something more than flying rats. “I’m just pointing to a correlation between our lives and theirs,” he says. “Our habitat is their habitat.” Go Back to Top. Skip To: Start of Article.
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Since TFS doesn't say, the old model says 21C is the best, while the "new" model says 24C is the best. The problem is, of course, that one can wear a sweater in colder temperatures, but it's difficult (or inappropriate) to cope with higher temperature.

As a young fat (by European standards, not American) male in a job with no format attire requirement, I usually wear a t-shirt and shorts in the summer, so there's not much left to take off. I'm still more comfortable at lower temperatures (22-23). I actually like wearing a hoodie, but I never do at the office because it's too hot there.

And no, opening a window (as suggested in TFA) is not a solution when there's 30 degrees outside.

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