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When you’re pumping away on your stationary bike, you generate a bit of energy, about 100 watts if you’re in good shape. People have been trying to come up with a way to harness that power, instead of letting it go unused. There are bikes that power blenders and gyms. One day, a group of college students hopes, your workout could power your washer.

The Bike Washing Machine is an idea from students at Dalian Nationalities University in China. They shared the concept on design site Tuvie. As you pedal, it turns the washing machine’s drum, tumbling the clothes with water and detergent. If you’re super efficient and the bike creates more energy than you need to power the machine, the extra juice can be stored or used immediately to power a small display screen that tracks your stats. While the idea of combining exercise with a tedious chore like laundry might seem doubly torturous to some, those in remote, electricity-less areas could potentially benefit from a similar device.

Related: Need to do a second load of laundry? Stick this mini drawer under your washer

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Following Friday's Apple Watch teardown, the experts at Chipworks posted a close-up look at the parts that make it tick, including X-ray imagery of Apple's new S1 system-on-chip design.

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In its own teardown, Chipworks noted that with all the new and proprietary technology Apple built in to Apple Watch, the device is the most sophisticated attempt at a wearable product to date. The firm points out that most devices on the market run on relatively old embedded chips, while Apple developed an entirely new package for Watch.

Since Apple's S1 SoC is encased in thin metal, Chipworks turned to X-ray imagery to peek inside before technicians can perform a careful and comprehensive disassembly. Initial images show a new STMicroelectronics 3mm-by-3mm land grid array (LGA) package with 3D digital gyroscope and accelerometer located in a top left corner socket.

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Developer Valve is now giving amateur programmers the opportunity to sell their homebrewed game add-ons via gaming platform Steam.

The new update for Steam Workshop, a feature built into the Steam client that showcases the work of amateur developers, allows content creators to offer their work for free, at a set price or as a "pay-what-you-want" proposition. The cost (or lack thereof) on a particular item is left entirely up to the creator, although the feature only applies to games that support paid mods.

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, which already has a robust community of fan-creators, is the first such Workshop game to support paid mods. It's also free to play on Steam through Sunday (that's not a coincidence). Valve confirmed that other Workshop games will add support for paid user content "in the coming weeks."

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Comcast CEO Brian Roberts made the rumors official today: Comcast is dropping its bid to buy Time Warner Cable. Certain regulators and politicians will claim victory. But that’s because they don’t understand the industry they are supposed to manage. In fact, despite the obvious egg on the face, Comcast executives either already know or will soon realize that losing this deal this soon is one of the better things to happen in a long time. Because Comcast needs to direct its attention elsewhere immediately — or miss the biggest shift in pay TV history since the advent of cable itself.

Don’t get me wrong; when Comcast announced its intention to buy Time Warner Cable, the company was sincere. And had regulators taken a light hand in the process, the deal could have closed and it would have added to the already massive broadband revenues the company already lands quarterly. But once it became clear that regulators were going to treat this deal like we were still living in 1985, Comcast executives were smart to realize that wasting a year trying to accommodate regulators’ concerns is a colossal waste of time when there are other, more pressing issues to confront.

What issues? Remember that when the deal was announced, HBO still wasn’t going direct, Sling TV didn’t exist, and Verizon hadn’t announced a national, over-the-top pay TV offering. Times have changed and in many regards, that’s the competitive field that Comcast needs to set its sights on, not the mucky and overregulated business of putting cables in the ground and obsolete set-top boxes in people’s homes.

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Posted by on in InfoGraphics

When J. Sterling Morton founded Arbor Day back in 1872, his idea was simple—set aside a special day for tree planting. And today, that idea is more important than ever.

I love trees. And you should too. You know why? Because without trees the human race would not be here. Trees supply us with the oxygen we breathe, we utilize their sap, wood, and leaves for products such as paper, mulch, building supplies and more.

We also get shaded by them on hot days and once in a while we might carve our love's name in their bark. Today's bonus infographic is about trees in honor of Arbor Day. I'm also a member of the Arbor Day Foundation.

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Posted by on in InfoGraphics

For this Friday (TGIF) an important topic to any business or individual trying to push their brand out into this great electronic frontier called the internet is how to do digital marketing.

In simplistic terms, digital marketing is the promotion of products or brands via one or more forms of electronic media. Digital marketing differs from traditional marketing in that it involves the use of channels and methods that enable an organization to analyze marketing campaigns and understand what is working and what isn’t – typically in real time.

As a digital marketer you will monitor things such as what is being viewed, how often and for how long, sales conversions, what content works and doesn’t work, etc.

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Over the past two years, France has been a leading country when it comes to open data and open government — and it is paying off. Only one year after joining the Open Government Partnership, France has just been elected to head the Partnership starting in October 2016.

I’ve been regularly covering France’s effort in this area as I think it’s an interesting take on open government. There are many other interesting projects coming out of Etalab. The team first relaunched Data.gouv.fr, France’s open data portal. This project showcases how data can be useful to modernize the French Government and State. It was also a great story as Etalab acts as a small startup within the government, tirelessly iterating on its projects.

The team also launched OpenFisca, an open-source tax simulator so that you can see how tax reforms affect French people. This is the kind of tools that can be useful for everyone — ministers, journalists and citizens. More recently, OpenStreetMap, La Poste, the IGN and Etalab partnered to launch an open database of addresses. This can be very useful for firemen, ambulances, telecommunication companies and more. For example, they can look up and reference any address without relying on Google Maps and other proprietary alternatives — and it’s very accurate.

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Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it's Superman -- in colour this time. In this video, Superfans have reworked the grey and muted tones of Zack Snyder's "Man of Steel" into "a Superman movie that looks like Superman!"

"Turns out there was a beautiful Zack Snyder movie hiding underneath the bleak coloring," says YouTube channel VideoLab, producer of the video. "Would 'Man of Steel' have been more successful at the box office if it wasn't colored like 'Schindler's List'?"

superman-steel-original-restored-smile.jpgHenry Cavill's Superman gets a super-makeover. VideoLab / Legendary Pictures / Warner Bros / DC

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Exclusive

Apple is introducing its new Watch across a limited number countries today, but only a few stores will have the device available for sale. Among that short list is Colette, a fashion boutique just a few blocks from Apple's own retail store at Carrousel, beneath the Louvre.

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By 10 a.m., more than 150 people were lined up at Colette, forming a queue around the corner and nearly all the way down to the Tuileries gardens. The line didn't start moving until 11 a.m.

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Today is Apple Watch D-Day for a speedy few early adopters, with Cupertino finally shipping the first batch of its debut wearable to buyers.  That means it’s also the day that serial repairers/tenacious teardowners iFixit get to crack open Apple’s latest sealed box and peer inside so we don’t have to.

Their teardown of a 38mm Apple Watch Sport and a 42mm Apple Watch steel are currently in progress — you can follow the painfully detailed dissection here.

One nugget of intel they’ve managed to prise out of the back of the dinky wrist computer so far is that Apple is not making it easy to swap out the S1 processor chip that powers the watch.

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Posted by on in PCWorld

Those using Magento’s e-commerce platform should ensure they’re using its latest software, as attackers are increasingly exploiting a flaw patched two months ago, security companies warned.

The vulnerability can allow an attacker to gain complete control over a store with administrator access, potentially allowing credit card theft, wrote Netanel Rubin of Check Point’s Malware and Vulnerability Research Group. As many as 200,000 websites use Magento, which is owned by eBay.

Check Point, which found the flaw, reported it to Magento, which issued a patch (SUPEE-5344) on Feb. 9. Since Check Point revealed the flaw earlier this week, it appears attackers have picked up on it and are trying to find unpatched applications.

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On April 23, 2005, at 8:27 p.m., YouTube co-founder Jawed Karim uploaded the first YouTube video, it is titled “Me at the zoo.”

The video was shot by his high school friend Yakov Lapitsky (who went on to become an engineering professor), it shows Karim talking about how cool elephants’ trunks are. The nearly 20-second clip has been viewed nearly 20 million times. Fast forward ten years later and YouTube is “the most valuable storytelling outlet and ranked as the second largest search engine on the internet. Check out the infographic.

Click the infographic to see the bigger picture and then again to zoom in.

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Famed Silicon Valley venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins is asking its former employee Ellen Pao for $972,814 in costs after Pao lost in a high-profile gender discrimination jury trial against Kleiner. The firm has said that it will waive the request for costs if Pao, who is currently the interim CEO of reddit, agrees not to appeal the jury's decision.

In 2012, Pao filed a lawsuit saying that she experienced harassment and sexism while working for Kleiner that the firm failed to discourage. She claimed that Kleiner didn't promote her and instead promoted three less-qualified men after she complained about her treatment, and she also claimed that the company fired her in retaliation after she sued them for gender discrimination. Pao asked for $16 million in damages from lost wages.

After a five-week trial this March, the jury ruled that Kleiner did not discriminate against Pao because of her gender.

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Posted by on in Tech Deals

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Gamestop and Techlick loves you and we want to pass the savings onto you for your weekend to download games at your leisure! Right now save big on bestselling titles like:

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In the three months leading up to March 31, 2015, Microsoft reported a 24 percent drop in revenue from its Xbox division compared with last year, attributing much of the decline to sales of an "increased mix of lower price Xbox One" consoles. Microsoft cut the price of the Xbox One from $500 to $400 (and it ditched the Kinect) in June 2014, and it's knocked off another $50 since. The corporate Xbox arm includes both the Xbox One and Xbox 360, and Microsoft did not separate sales of each console in its Q3 2015 financial report. Hardware revenue overall was down just 4 percent, boosted by Surface tablet sales, which were up 44 percent over last year to $713 million.

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Apple on Thursday released a pair of small but important software updates, one dealing with iMac kernel panics triggered when previewing JPEG files and another adding WatchKit compatibility to TestFlight's iOS beta-testing platform.

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The first is identified as the iMac Graphics Update and can be downloaded by owners of any 2013 iMac or the 2014 5K model. Apple notes that on systems running OS X 10.10.3, viewing "very large" JPEG files in Finder or Preview can cause a computer to freeze, show a black screen, and restart.

Complaints about the problem emerged last week. At the time, some people said they were experiencing the glitch on more than just iMacs, which could mean that additional updates are forthcoming.

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It is the 10th anniversary of YouTube. We celebrate with our favorite videos.
10 Astonishing Email Habits

10 Astonishing Email Habits

(Click image for larger view and slideshow.)

April 23 is the 10th anniversary of the day the first-ever YouTube video was posted.

It is hard to imagine life before YouTube. In just a decade it seems like everything that ever happened has been memorialized in a two-minute video on YouTube. I'm sure that if it isn't there already, soon we'll have real-time footage of the big bang up for people to comment on.

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So, we already wrote about some of the crazy filings from John Deere and GM claiming that when you buy a vehicle from them, you don't really own it, thanks to the software inside, which those companies argue they still really own. This was part of the opposition to requests for exemption from Section 1201 of the DMCA. Once again, Section 1201 is the anti-circumvention clause, that says you can't break DRM even if it's for non-infringing purposes. But... every three years, the Librarian of Congress is allowed to "exempt" certain classes of items from Section 1201. the responses above concerned locking down automotive software, but there are some other crazy ones as well.

For example, the DVD Copy Control Association (DVD CCA) and the Advanced Access Content System Licensing Administrator (AACS LA) are so worried about an exemption for certain kinds of DVDs that it ran to the Copyright Office to claim that you simply don't own the DVDs you buy, and they'd really appreciate it if people stopped thinking they actually bought the DVD that, you know, they bought:

When consumers buy a DVD or Blu-ray disc, they are not purchasing the motion picture itself, rather they are purchasing access to the motion picture which affords only the right to access the work according to the format’s particular specifications (i.e., through the use of a DVD player), or the Blu-ray Disc format specifications (i.e., through the use of a Blu-ray format player). Consumers are able to purchase the copy at its retail price because it is distributed on a specific medium that will play back on only a licensed player.
Notice that even this statement is self-contradictory. The first sentence says they are not purchasing any content, but merely a "right to access." And yet, the very next sentence talks about the "purchase [of] the copy." So which is it? Are people purchasing a copy of the movie? Or are they merely licensing access to the content on the plastic?

This is a problem with Section 1201, showing how its expansive nature is fundamentally changing the concept of ownership in ways many people haven't even begun to understand yet.

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Though the iPod lineup has not seen any significant changes since late 2012, Apple will revisit its media players this year with an anticipated update to at least one model, a source has told AppleInsider.

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A source familiar with Apple's future product plans indicated that Apple's iPods — specifically the largest-screened model, the iPod touch — are expected to see an update later this year.

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