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Since it launched in February I've been a pretty big fan of the Saturday Night Live app, and the latest update should make it quite a bit better. Now there's native iPad support (hooray!) in addition to it being available on Android devices. NBC's also gone back and remastered some of the old sketches, added around 400 more (including some of the late Phil Hartman's "Unfrozen Caveman Lawyer" bits) and tossed AirPlay support in so you can watch the clips via an Apple TV. Curiously, Chromecast beaming is still missing in action, but at least now you can text the new Church Lady emoji to let a pal know they're speeeecial.

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Apple Apple TV 3rd-gen
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Type Audio / video player Video services iTunes, Netflix, YouTube, Other Audio services iTunes Video codec support h.264 / AVC, Motion JPEG, MPEG-4, Quicktime Audio codec support AAC, MP3, WAV Video outputs HDMI (1 outputs) Audio outputs via HDMI, TOSLINK (optical) Released 2012-03-16 see all specs →

8.7average user rating

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Silicon Valley and the wider world of technology are mourning the very sudden death of Dave Goldberg, a long time entrepreneur and investor, CEO of SurveyMonkey, husband of Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, father and friend to many. The news was made public earlier today in a Facebook post from his brother Robert.

“It’s with incredible shock and sadness that I’m letting our friends and family know that my amazing brother, Dave Goldberg, beloved husband of Sheryl Sandberg, father of two wonderful children, and son of Paula Goldberg, passed away suddenly last night,” he wrote. “In this time of sorrow, we mourn his passing and remember what an amazing husband, father, brother, son and friend he was.”

His brother added that in lieu of donations, Sheryl and the couple’s children request that those who would like to share memories or pictures of Dave, to do so on Dave’s Facebook page. It’s filling up quickly with very touching thoughts and pictures, a testament to the person Dave was.

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Let the coding begin! Over a 1,000 hackers have filed into The Manhattan Center and is diligently banging out code and tearing apart APIs. Over the next 24 hours these teams will work furiously, powered by Red Bull and Nerf Gun tomfoolery, to create a stunning application or hardware project.

Starting tomorrow at 11:30, these teams will present on the massive Disrupt stage. The presentations are open to the public and live streamed on TechCrunch.

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Microsoft RoomAlive

Got a Kinect, a projector and a knack for code? If so, you can create a Star Trek-like holodeck in your living room. Microsoft has released the RoomAlive Toolkit, a software framework that lets you string together Kinect motion trackers to create interactive projection maps. You can use it to build anything from extra-immersive games through to art displays. This isn't exactly a trivial undertaking (Microsoft is promising lots of tutorials), but it means that you won't have to wait for someone else to bring your augmented reality dreams to life.

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Moblab has made a persuasive infographic about game-based learning with the result from interview with hundreds of economic professors. Based in Pasadena, CA, MobLab is a venture capital backed start up dedicated to delivering mobile education for interactive games in social science classroom. Led by founders from Caltech, it’s a group of dedicated engineers, academics, designers, and entrepreneurs. With a MobLab account you can setup, run, and analyze games in classrooms, laboratories, and in the field.

Click the image below to see the bigger picture and then one more time to become enlightened.

gamingsmall

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Five Years Ago

This week in 2010, the world was abuzz over the prototype iPhone that was left in a bar, and we discussed the legal fallout and its implications for bloggers-as-journalists. At the same time, another case found that a blog commenters was not a journalist. In the old-school journalism world, Rupert Murdoch was moving towards paywalls while his competitors were proudly promising to remain free, and the New York Times was struggling to find reasons to like its paywall.

Lots happened on the copyright front this week. A historical association claimed copyright over scans of 100-year-old photos while we asked why UNESCO was launching pro-copyright efforts; Twitter was removing a lot of tweets over bogus DMCA takedowns while a horrible new bill in congress sought to extend DMCA takedowns to cover "personal information"; the U.S. Chamber of Commerce released a bogus study pushing for more IP enforcement while the IFPI's latest report actually showed music sales growth in some markets; the USTR released its "revised" Special 301 report (and continued to lie about ACTA) while the Justice Department boosted the number of FBI agents and attorneys focused on copyright infringement; and the RIAA utterly missed the point about Record Store Day but also got AFL-CIO to sign on in support of a proposed performance tax. Internationally, Shanghai was cracking down on (read: pushing underground) bootleg discs, Chile got a mixed bag of new copyright laws, and an Irish collection society was trying to get music bloggers to pay up.

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This Cheat Sheet Lists the Shelf Life of Common Spices

Spices don’t last forever, and fresher is better. If you have a few spices you don’t use all that often, make sure they haven’t lost that flavor with this cheat sheet.

Whole spices tend to last longer, while dried herbs, flowers, and zested citrus lie on the shorter end of the spectrum. You may get a slightly longer shelf life than quoted in the sheet, but freshness will usually start to decline after a few months. Check out the chart below and if you haven’t given your spice drawer a good cleaning in awhile, now may be a good time!

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Not too long ago, people got pretty excited about the idea of a "modular smartphone", and recently Google announced that it would be launching its attempt at such a device in Puerto Rico this year. The idea has also sparked a lot of debate, with some saying the sacrifice of size and/or power needed to create something modular would be too great. But there's one idea I don't recall anyone bringing up at the time: moving the whole modular concept off of the phone and onto a phone case. This week, we're looking at the nexpaq, which does just that:

The Good

There's something very appealing about the modular components, as they seem to strike most people as something that just makes sense. Obviously with them living as extras on the case rather than being part of the phone, some of the original idea's efficiency and space-saving appeal is lost — but that was already debatable (though we'll see what Google comes up with) and I think most people were far more drawn to the modular function itself as a matter of convenience and coolness. It also makes the whole power situation a little easier to deal with: the case has a built-in battery pack (which helps run both the modules and your phone) and you can fill one of the modular slots with an additional battery pack component. This also means that the case can function independently: you can disconnect it from your phone, and still access the modules via Bluetooth. The other modules currently available in the Kickstarter include an amplified speaker, an SD card reader, a pair of physical programmable hotkeys, a laser pointer, a breathalyzer, a USB drive and several more diverse options which paint a good picture of the flexibility offered by the system. $109 gets you a case and four modules (which seems like a good price) and the current model is designed to be compatible with three very popular phones: the iPhone 6, Galaxy S6 Edge and the Galaxy S5.

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Top 10 Computer Disasters (and How to Deal with Them)

Using a computer means occasionally dealing with annoying, possibly disastrous problems like losing all your data if your hard drive crashes. Here are ten of the most common computer problems and how to deal with them.

10. Your Laptop Was Lost or Stolen

Top 10 Computer Disasters (and How to Deal with Them)

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Editor’s note: Robin Vasan is a managing director of Mayfield, a global early-stage venture capital firm. He previously founded or worked in key positions at several software startups. He has an MBA from Harvard Business School and a dual bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering and economics from Stanford University.

I graduated from Stanford in the late 1980s with a dual degree in engineering and economics, and, like so many others of my day, I was drawn to Wall Street. Reaganomics was in full swing, Bloomberg terminals were still in their early days and popular culture was full of colorful characters like Gordon Gekko.

Wall Street was booming and firms were waking up to the massive potential of marrying technology and complex mathematics. Technology was transitioning from PCs running Lotus 123 to firms installing real-time data feeds and legions of Sun workstations. Foundational algorithms like Black-Scholes and binomial pricing models and Monte Carlo simulations were just starting to take hold.

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Ladies and gentlemen, the C programming language. It’s a classic. It is sleek, and spartan, and elegant. (Especially compared to its sequel, that bloated mess C++, which shares all the faults I’m about to describe.) It is blindingly, quicksilver fast, because it’s about as close to the bone of the machine as you can get. It is time-tested and ubiquitous. And it is terrifyingly dangerous.

But don’t take my word for it. Take the word of living legend John Carmack:

Found two pointer-to-out-of-scope-stack bugs today. I like tight native code, but C/C++ still makes me worry a lot.

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You already get too many notifications. Your phone, tablet, and maybe even your smartwatch are constantly buzzing with emails or news alerts.

PCs are the last refuge for the notification-weary—but not for long. Google's Chrome browser is getting ready to join the chorus, as web sites and many web-friendly apps are gaining the ability to send you push notifications.

Fortunately, there’s a way to tame the noise on your Chromebook. With just a few tweaks, you can take complete control over the alerts you receive. It's just a few steps, so dig in with us as we show you how to put Chrome in check.

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The week began with a financial bang, as Apple published the results of its record-breaking second quarter, but later saw controversies swirl with Apple Watch production obstacles and problems for wearers with tattoos. AppleInsider meanwhile reviewed the device, finding it attractive but saddled with some flaws.

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Apple reaps $13.6 billion in second-quarter results

On Monday Apple announced $58 billion in revenue and $13.6 billion in net profits for the March-quarter, driven mostly by sales of 61.17 million iPhones. iPad sales were down, though, meaning Macs actually eclipsed the tablet in terms of revenue.

Apple simulatenously added another $50 billion to its capital return program, with the goal of reaching $200 billion in dividends and stock buybacks by March 2017. Some other announcements included the goal of bringing the Apple Watch to more countries in June, and Best Buy launching support for Apple Pay despite being allied with rival mobile payment service MCX.

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From customizable clock faces to notifications, quickly referencing important information without having to dive into an app is a key feature of the Apple Watch. Dubbed Glances, users can access these bits of information with just a single swipe.

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From the clock face of your Apple Watch, swipe up from the bottom of the screen to access any enabled Glances. Swipe left and right to scroll through all the Glances activated on your Watch, like the built-in Now Playing Glance.

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Users can add, remove and rearrange Glances using the Apple Watch app on their iPhone.

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Leave it to Audi to make headlights something interesting to talk about. Not satisfied with their laser light technology, they’re hard at work incorporating that with the matrix-beam system they demonstrated working with LED lighting.

To bring you up to speed, the matrix lighting maps out a grid for the headlight beam area. Instead of shutting off or redirecting the whole beam, the LED tech can simply turn off the light in a section where the light might be blinding. In practical terms, if the car detected an oncoming vehicle, it would still brightly illuminate the dark path in front of the car and just switch off the part of the beam where another vehicle was traveling.

Audi Laser / Matrix Headlights

Getting this to work with its laser light tech isn’t a matter of just swapping out the light source. Laser light tends to be more direct and intense, so the solution Audi has been working on revolves around a system called the Intelligent Laser Light For Compact and High-Resolution Adaptive Headlights.

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One of the beautiful things about Netflix is the service’s addictive formula of unloading every episode of a series’ latest season at once. Those wondering just how much impact the Netflix way has had on the TV industry need only look at NBC’s latest series, Aquarius. The upcoming David Duchovny drama, which debuts May 28 on NBC, will follow the Netflix mantra, allowing fans to binge-watch the remaining 12 episodes online the following morning.

Related: The X-Files will be opened again for new series with Mulder and Scully

In a first for network TV, NBC has announced that it will make all 13 episodes of the new series available on NBC.com, as well as the NBC mobile app, and on cable VOD platforms the day after the series debut.

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Non-game Android apps are normally written in Java, but a group inside Google is experimenting with a whole new way of writing Android apps using Dart, Google's in-house Web development language. It's Android apps with no Java, a focus on speed, and deep integration with the Web.

Dart was created by members of Chrome's V8 Javascript engine team, after being frustrated with some aspects of the 20-year-old language they dealt with on a day-to-day basis. The group recently held a Dart Developer Summit where it showed off the Dart on Android project. Dart on Android isn't called something obvious like "Dart on Android,"—it's going by the name of "Sky." For now Sky (Dart on Android) is just an open source experiment, but the project offers a lot of promise compared to traditional app development.

Being fast and responsive is one of the biggest goals for Sky. While 60FPS (or Hz) is the smoothness standard most devices and app developers aim for, the Dart team wants to crank that up to 120FPS, which isn't even possible to display on the standard 60Hz smartphone screens we have today. That sounds rather improbable on Android, where many apps don't stay at 60FPS, let alone 120. Rendering an app at 60FPS requires a frame to be drawn every 16ms, and apps "jank" or display an animation stutter, when they can't keep up with the 16ms deadline.

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Tin foil is beneath government budget levels. We must now gold plate the interior of our space ships.

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