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Posted by on in How To's

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How to lock down your wireless router effectively is a concern amongst most home internet users. These days we have to battle adware, malware, hijacked web sites, spam-ware and a host of viruses that may invade our systems. The best and most simple way to lock down your router is to use WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy). But in all reality, if someone wants to get into your router they will break into it easily if you only have WEP enabled.

You need to lock it down like a real pro. The following tips will help you lock down your router and secure it from prying nomads.

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Check Your MacBook Prox2019;s Battery When The Trackpad Stops Clicking

MacBook Pro users are all too familiar with a trackpad that doesn't click properly. Sometimes it just wears out. Before you do an expensive repair, check your MacBook's battery for bulging.

Over at MacIssues, they list a bunch of reason your trackpad may stop working. Believe it or not, it may be the battery. Batteries often bulge as they get older, and since the battery is located right under the trackpad on some models, that bulge pushes against the trackpad.

All you need to do is remove the battery, plug the laptop into the wall, and see if the issue persists. Places like Other World Computing sell batteries and show you how to remove them. Check out the link for other reasons why your trackpad could be failing.

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Posted by on in Techlick

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How to lock down your wireless router effectively is a concern amongst most home internet users. These days we have to battle adware, malware, hijacked web sites, spam-ware and a host of viruses that may invade our systems. The best and most simple way to lock down your router is to use WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy). But in all reality, if someone wants to get into your router they will break into it easily if you only have WEP enabled.

You need to lock it down like a real pro. The following tips will help you lock down your router and secure it from prying nomads.

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Feature

Apple has packed its all-new MacBook with some impressive technology, but its outstanding battery life — nine hours from a single charge — may be the most staggering. AppleInsider took a look under the hood to see how they could have done it.

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On the surface, nine hours of battery life may not seem all that spectacular. The refreshed 13-inch MacBook Pro, which also runs on Intel's power-sipping Broadwell chips, got nearly two hours more during our testing earlier this month.

There's one catch: the MacBook Pro has a battery nearly twice the size.

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Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives.

village.jpgWas this really necessary? Screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

Please feel free to be sickened, indifferent, appalled or even depressed. But please don't say you're surprised.

An explosion in Manhattan's East Village on Thursday left more than 20 people injured and two still missing. Work by firefighters, putting out the last stubborn bits of the blaze and digging through the rubble, continued into Saturday. The effort is, for some people, an event.

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Posted by on in Gizmodo

Color Isn't Always About Sex, Study Finds

When it comes to birds, males—with their bright feathers, extra accessories, and impressive mating displays—tend to get all the attention. But for many birds, such as the Choco Toucan pictured above, brilliant plumage has nothing to do with sex, and everything to do with survival.

That, at least, is the conclusion of researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, after comparing male and female plumage in nearly a thousand species of birds. The researchers found that while males often have brighter feathers than females, guys and gals are actually more similar than they are different. Because color affects things like predator avoidance and foraging success, it's driven by natural selection as much as sexual selection.

"Although most studies of bird plumage focus on dichromatism, evolutionary change has most often led to similar, rather than different, plumage in males and females," the authors write in their paper.

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Posted by on in CNET

The Lumia 535 is among the Windows Phones that will be able to run the next test build of Windows 10. Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Microsoft's Operating Systems Group team has added code to the next test build of Windows 10 Mobile that will allow that release to work on the majority of Windows Phones.

When Microsoft released the first test build of Windows 10 Mobile in February, it was built to run only on a handful of Lumia devices, specifically the Lumia 630, 635, 636, 638, 730 and 830 phones. Microsoft execs attributed the small number of initially supported devices to the "very tight OS partitions" that left insufficient room for the installation process to update the OS in place.

But the second test build, which may not be available until the first week of April or so, will support the majority of existing Windows Phones. Microsoft officials went public with the list of Windows Phones that will likely be able to run the next test build in a March 27 blog post.

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If you're going to a music festival this summer, it might be difficult to fit your group's flower crowns into a single selfie. Coachella and Lollapalooza have officially banned selfie sticks. Lollapalooza also bans "narsisstics," which is either a typo or a bad pun.

This is probably because selfie sticks are annoying. You know there are people who will hoist them into the air in the middle of a set, blind to the fact that the people behind them are trying to watch DJ Snake or whatever. This is why umbrellas are the worst thing about outdoor shows. It's just rain you guys! Thankfully, umbrellas are also banned.

There you have it: no selfie sticks, just mud and bass drops. Sorry Sam Smith fans — for now, your arms will have to do.

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We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

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Former Hewlett-Packard Co Chief Executive Carly Fiorina on Sunday said the chances of her running for U.S. presidency were “very high” and she would announce her plans in late April-early May.

Fiorina, speaking on Fox News Sunday, put the chances of her running for president in 2016 at ‘higher than 90 percent’ but said she could not yet announce the bid as she was working to establish her team, get “the right support” and financial resources.

(Reporting by Alina Selyukh; editing by Susan Thomas)

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Five Best Headsets with Attached Microphones

Whether you're gaming, taking video calls, listening to music, or doing all three, a good headset makes a huge difference. There are tons of choices on the market, lots of them good, but this week we're looking at five of the best, based on your nominations.

Earlier in the week we asked you which headsets you thought were the best for whatever you may want to do—whether it's chatting with teammates in-game, talking to coworkers on Hangouts or Skype, or listening to music when you're not doing the other two. You offered tons of great nominations—way more than we have room for here. Even so, here are the five options that rose to the top, in no particular order:

Sennheiser PC350 Special Edition

Five Best Headsets with Attached Microphones

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Posted by on in Slashdot

So... what's to discuss. I don't think there's a law against being a complete asshole, so smart projects wins.

For Trademark rights to be effective, you have to both register them AND have exclusive use of the mark when you registered it, AND continue to maintain that exclusive use of the mark.

It would seem that Smart Projects might have registered first, but failed to maintain exclusive use, therefore, resulting in Arduino SRL acquiring the trademark as well.

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Posted by on in CNET

xdsc01727.jpgFinding a Commodore 64 computer wasn't difficult for exhibit curator Kimon Keramidas. The challenge was finding a monitor. Initially, he bought a 1985 RCA television for $5 to use as a monitor and paid $85 to ship it. Joan E. Solsman/CNET Technology, even equipment that's long outdated and shunted aside, can still strike an emotional chord.

Just ask Kimon Keramidas, curator of "The Interface Experience," an exhibit that rounded up tech milestones from 40 years of personal computing for visitors to see and touch. He said almost everyone has a favorite item they make a beeline to and greet like an old friend.

"It's either 'Oh my God, it was so great!' or 'Oh my God, that was so hard to use,'" Keramidas said. "It's an emotional thing. People are connecting at more than just an intellectual level."

The show, which opens Friday at the Focus Gallery of the Bard Graduate Center in New York City, offers visitors a trip through history with what is essentially a gadgety greatest hits. On display are more than 25 different devices, as well as a wall of more than a hundred mobile phones (what Keramidas calls his cell phone "petting zoo") -- all of which can be touched and, in some cases, played with.

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Is there a significant antigen left in this foam?

I know people can be allergic to almost anything, but this looks to me like only relatively simple innocuous compounds remain in the foam.

The point being on the battlefield, what proportion of people would be killed by this from anaphylaxis (say) rather than saved by it?

Rgds

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angry tapir writes: The Australian government has revealed its (previously mooted) proposed legislation that will allow copyright holders to apply for court orders that will force ISPs to block access to pirate websites. It forms part of a broader Australian crackdown on online copyright infringement, which also includes a warning notice scheme for alleged infringers. They're not the only ones getting on board with website blocking — a judge in Spain ruled that local ISPs must block access to The Pirate Bay.
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Posted by on in Slashdot
An anonymous reader writes: A light bulb made from graphene — said by its UK developers to be the first commercially viable consumer product using the super-strong carbon — is to go on sale later this year. The dimmable LED bulb with a graphene-coated filament was designed at Manchester University, where the material was discovered in 2004. It is said to cut energy use by 10% and last longer owing to its conductivity. It is expected to be priced lower than current LED bulbs, which cost about £15 (~$22) each.
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Here's something: Ben Stiller probably listened to a lot noisy proto-punk in high school. You know how I know? Because A-list actor, Meet the Parents star, and plucky goofball Ben Stiller was in a band back in his teen days. He played the drums. He played the drums like a wild, pubescent kid who thought The Stooges were dad rock but totally worshipped Arto Lindsay.

Ben Stiller, rock star

In a classic angry-teen-with-limited-vocabulary move, the band was called Capital Punishment and their only album was 1982's Road Kill. It's actually not bad. It's very esoteric, industrial noise music, but the song above has a weird squawking thing going on that keeps it interesting. And, dream of all dreams, NYC label Captured Tracks is reissuing the whole thing sometime this fall.

Stars: they're just like us.

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Review

With "Becoming Steve Jobs," coauthors Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli seek to dismantle perceptions of Jobs the egomaniacal, callous autocrat, replacing accepted opinion with a retelling of the life of a man who they describe — for better or worse — as being "half genius, half asshole."

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"Becoming Steve Jobs" is far from being primer on the late Apple cofounder. Background, when it is offered, is scarce and in many cases superficial, produced mainly as expository evidence bolstering the authors' thesis.

That being said, readers who have at least some semblance of Jobs' personal history will greatly appreciate the book's cache of previously unknown details. Indeed, if someone has heard of Jobs, they are also likely to have been exposed to the cliché that he was an impassive, uncaring dictator.

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Angie’s List has joined a growing number of companies to protest a new law in Indiana that critics say could open the door to discrimination based on sexual orientation.

The Indianapolis company said it would put a planned expansion of its campus on hold in the wake of passage of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act. The business ratings service said it needs to evaluate the implications of the law for its current and future employees.

“Angie’s List is open to all and discriminates against none and we are hugely disappointed in what this bill represents,” Chief Executive Bill Oesterle said in a statement Saturday.

Angie’s List is one of several companies criticizing the new law, which allows companies or individuals to refuse actions that impose a “substantial burden” on their religious beliefs. Thousands of people gathered Saturday to protest the law’s passage.

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It's been over a month since Llama 1 and Llama 2 stole our hearts during a glorious high-speed chase through Sun City, Arizona. Now it looks like the furry celebs — whose names are Kahkneeta and Laney — have had their last taste of sweet, sweet fame. The USDA contacted the llamas' owners soon after the chase, saying they needed a license to showcase the animals at public events, The Guardian reports. And the owners, Bub Bullis and Karen Freund, are not happy about it.

Bye llamas

"They just totally destroyed everything I had planned for my retirement," Freund told The Guardian. "We’ve taken [the llamas] to schools before. Now they’re telling me I can’t do anything, even like a photo shoot."

The USDA requires any warmblooded animals being displayed in public or used in educational presentations to be licensed with the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). Certain animal exhibitors, like those in state fairs or animal preserves, are exempt. Kahkneeta and Laney, however, are not. Bullis and Freund have since attempted to contact the USDA, but because all correspondence must be done in writing, they've given up, The Guardian reports.

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Curb Overspending by Establishing a x201c;No Return Policyx201d;

Generous return policies make shopping easy. After all, if you don't like it, you can return it. That could lead to overspending. If you're prone to this type of thinking, establish a personal "no return policy" to keep your spending in check.

Of course, if your purchase is defective, broken, or doesn't perform properly, return it—no need to be that strict. The goal is to avoid the "eh, I can always return it" attitude—especially if you know you probably won't. You have to be willing to be stuck with an item though before you buy it. This internal policy makes you think hard if you need something now rather than buy-and-return-it-later. Check out the link for other ways stores manipulate our buying behavior.

How to Avoid Impulse Buying: The Deep Down Psychology That Retailers Use Against You, and How to Create a Rock Solid Emotional Fortress Against It | Academy Success

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Pin-Sized Book Reminds Us of Life's Little Pleasures

If you're feeling down, this pin-sized book may be just the thing to cheer you up. Just don't put it in your pocket, or it'll be lost forever.

"Life's Lil Pleasures" was created by illustrator and designer Evan Lorenzen. Lorenzen has spent the last year building a library of "micro books" with diverse themes, including one that details major events in Earth's history, a tiny book of big words, and a field guide to cereal. Armed with nothing but paper, thread, a sewing needle and a pen, Lorenzen says his goal has been to scale down the book-making process as much as he can without using any sort of magnifying instrument.

With Lorenzen's blessing, Gizmodo readers can now enjoy a sneak peek beneath the tiny book's cover. Remember: It's the little things that count, like eating cereal out of your enemy's skull.

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In a bit of accidental perfect timing, Forbes just published its Midas List of top tech investors.

GGV Capital partner Jenny Lee is the first woman to crack its list of Top 10 investors, which is led by such well-known figures as Sequoia Capital’s Jim Goetz, who backed WhatsApp, the mobile messaging company acquired by Facebook for $22 billion, and Lowercase Capital founder Chris Sacca, an early investor in Twitter.

In the wake of the Ellen Pao gender discrimination trial, which shed a harsh light on the clubby world of venture capital, we decided to see how many women made it to the hot 100 of tech investors. The answer? Five (including Lee). That’s worse than the national average of 6 percent of female partners, according to research from Babson College.

Internet trends guru Mary Meeker, a general partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers — the firm at the center of Pao’s  suit — came in at No. 15 on the Forbes’ list. Biotech investor Beth Seidenberg, another partner at Kleiner, also made the cut.

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DashCast Streams Dashboard-Style Web Pages to Your Chromecast

Chrome: Google Chrome can send any web page to your Chromecast. If you want to close the tab on your computer, though, the content won't refresh. DashCast updates the page so you'll have the latest content.

After you plug in the link to DashCast, you can set how often you want the page to refresh. Then, just close Chrome. It's perfect for constantly changing content like news, weather, or sports, and it won't bog down your computer like casting a Chrome tab would.

DashCast | Github

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Turning Styrofoam Into Aluminum is Surprisingly Easy

If you're looking for a fun, high-risk weekend project, look no further: Grant Thompson, the self-styled "King of Random", has decided to shared his method for transforming styrofoam into metal. (Spoiler: don't try this one around your kids.)

To start, you'll need to cut a model of your soon-t0-be metal creation out of foam. Thompson suggests using foam board from the dollar store, but foam housing insulation or craft blocks will work just as well. Once assembled, attach a thick foam riser to the top of your model, and bury it in a 5-gallon bucket filled with sand.

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Maybe not so smart. Sounds kinda blurry, like a Gen I night vision scope. I think I'd wait a little bit to make sure he doesn't grow things in inappropriate places or start photosynthesizing. But they do have the benefit of previous research as some form of chemotherapy so I guess it won't kill you right off.

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Somebody Found the Most Appropriate Use For the Nintendo Virtual Boy

Remember the Virtual Boy, Nintendo's early, failed foray into virtual reality gaming? Twenty years after its release, somebody's finally figured out the best use for the unwieldily console: Giving all of your friends a handlebar moustache.

According to Hackaday, coder and designer Joe Grand bought a broken Virtual Boy several years back at Portland Retro Gaming Expo. Unsure what else to do with it, he took it upon himself to learn about facial recognition and image processing using OpenCV. He retrofitted the console with a BeagleBone Black Linux computer and created "Mustache Mayhem," a game where you score "mojo" by holding staches over your friends' faces, until those friends can't stand being around you anymore.

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Use x201c;Collection Management Policiesx201d; to Curate Your Collectibles

Whether you have a formal collection or just a bunch of things, all that stuff can overwhelm you. Even if you don't have museum quality items, setting some policies might keep it all in check.

Unclutterer explains why you might be able to get rid of a few things if you take a curation approach:

Museums sometimes remove items if they are redundant with others in the collection or if they are "of lesser quality than other objects of the same type in the collection." They may also remove items that are "unduly difficult or impossible to care for or store properly." Items may also get damaged to a degree where they no longer fit within the scope of the collection, and those items would be removed.

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This week marked the close of the historic Ellen Pao-Kleiner Perkins gender discrimination trial, and a re-launch of Facebook’s commerce ambitions at its F8 developers’ conference in San Francisco. Here’s what went down:

On Friday, the jury in the Ellen Pao-Kleiner Perkins trial found against Ellen Pao on all of her claims. Re/code’s Liz Gannes explained how the trial’s real impact is outside the courtroom (and how what happened outside affected the trial’s key players). Two prominent female tech executives — ex-Yahoo Sue Decker and ex-Palm Donna Dubinsky — penned guest columns representing differing perspectives of the case. And for those who missed the details, we made a “Who’s Who?” of the trial, timeline and guide to VC jargon to help get you up to speed. The big announcement at Facebook’s F8 conference earlier this week: Developers can now build services into Messenger and Facebook has shiny new mobile ad technology to compete with Google and Twitter. The Messenger news is especially big for shopping and payments. In response to Indiana’s new law legalizing discrimination against LGBT people for religious reasons, Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff said his company won’t be holding any events in Indiana until the law changes. Salesforce employs a couple thousand people in the state, and a Salesforce event in Indianapolis last year drew 10,000 attendees. Tech companies that make products for babies face some serious challenges: Their users age out, the customers have specialized needs and so on. Here’s how these businesses adapt. The unlikely Blackberry turnaround is chugging along, as the company reported another surprise quarterly profit of 4 cents per share. A recent Wall Street Journal report says the Federal Trade Commission’s leadership ignored a staff recommendation to pursue antitrust charges against Google. FTC members have vociferously denied the allegations. A new feature from Re/code: Re/boxing. We send back the stuff that we don’t like, and we explain why. (We actually send everything back as a policy but we’ll write about the stinkers.) First up, the Nike+ FuelBand fitness tracker. Is Meerkat’s reign over? Twitter launched its livestreaming app Periscope, and if you actually plan on streaming video to Twitter then you should probably switch over to Periscope. If you’ve ever had any questions about Apple TV, here’s your chance to learn all about it with our new installment of “Too Embarrassed to Ask.” Google is working on a service that will let you pay all your bills within Gmail, code-named “Pony Express.” The company also hired a new CFO, Morgan Stanley’s Ruth Porat.
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